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Bikers should wear hi-vis to reduce crash and injury toll ? report

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  • Bikers should wear hi-vis to reduce crash and injury toll ? report


    Motorcyclists should wear more hi-vis clothing and older riders should get more skills training to reduce the risk of crashing, according to a major study into motorcycle crashes and injuries.

    Speed limits should also be reduced in high-risk areas in rural and remote areas, the study of national crash data by Monash University?s Accident Research Centre found.

    Riders were more at risk than 10 years ago compared to other road users, the report said, and that injuries were more severe on high-speed roads in remote areas.

    The report, Current Trends in Motorcycle-related Crash and Injury Risk in Australia by researchers Laurie Budd, Trevor Allen and Stuart Newstead also said that sports motorcycles had the highest crash risk of road bikes and were becoming more prevalent in the fleet.

    ?Further adverse effects on motorcycle safety are stemming from the trend to

    increasing power to weight ratio of newer motorcycles which has shown a significant association with more severe injury outcomes in a crash,?? the report said.

    Cruiser bikes, such as Harley-Davidsons, were rated second at risk of a severe injury crash outcome.

    ?It is possible that the exposure for cruisers is also over-estimated by registrations, as they are a type popular for recreational usage, so will often only come out of the garage on the weekend.??

    It found that older riders were more likely to be injured in crashes.

    ?Injury crash rates for riders aged 60 years and over doubled over the 10 years.??

    The report called for licence refresher training for older riders, to stem further increases in serious injury and deaths.

    Victorian Motorcycle Council spokesman John Eacott criticised the call for hi-vis clothing, which he said was not a proven safety measure.

    Hi-vis vests became mandatory for learner riders in Victoria in 2014 on the back of no hard evidence, he said.

    The report also did not tackle the ?elephant in the room?, he said.

    ?They haven?t once addressed the issue of educating other road users to look out for motorcyclists on the road,?? Mr Eacott said.

    The latest findings come two months after the launch of a world-first program, based in Victoria, to rate protective motorcycle clothing.

    MotoCAP ? the Motorcycle Clothing Assessment Program ? provides riders with online assessments after testing by Deakin University?s Institute For Frontier Materials in Geelong.

    [email protected]

    @IanRoyall

    https://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/vi...c437823624d12a
    SINNERS MCC AUSTRALIA
    If we believe in “freedom”, we don’t get to choose whose freedom is most worth defending.
    Out of 5 million sperm... your the retard that got through? and I thought I was having a bad day!

  • #2
    They keep dribbling out the same old plop.
    Dont get me confused with someone who gives a fuck

    Comment


    • #3
      How do these "researchers" keep getting grants to reproduce the same crap. A Hi-Vis vest is not going to save a sport bike rider who uses the
      road as his race track and goes into a guard rail or into an oncoming car. It's not going to save a cruiser rider who thinks he is riding a sport bike
      and does the same. A Hi-Vis vest is not going to save anyone from someone in any car or truck that is looking at their phone.

      "They haven?t once addressed the issue of educating other road users to look out for motorcyclists on the road,?? Mr Eacott said."

      That is the only sensible comment I have seen.
      Allan

      Comment


      • #4
        Well said.
        The trick is to grow old. "Growing up" is less important than surviving.

        Comment


        • #5
          Agreed Allan

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