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Sniff test: Berejiklian government to swab drivers for cocaine after police pressure

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  • Sniff test: Berejiklian government to swab drivers for cocaine after police pressure

    Sniff test: Berejiklian government to swab drivers for cocaine after police pressure

    Coalition’s move follows months of lobbying from NSW police, who say test will improve road safety

    Drivers in New South Wales will be subject to roadside tests for cocaine, the latest addition to the state’s mobile drug testing regime.

    Guardian Australia understands it will come as part of a broader road safety policy announcement. News Corp reported that the premier, Gladys Berejiklian, would announce the new tests on Monday.

    In NSW police are currently able to conduct roadside tests for cannabis, amphetamines and methamphetamine or “ice”, and MDMA. The tests itself – a saliva swab – will not need to be changed to test for cocaine.

    The move comes after months of lobbying from NSW police. Earlier in January the state’s police commissioner said roadside cocaine testing would have a “positive outcome on the road toll and road safety”.

    But statistics suggest cocaine is not a major contributor to roadside deaths caused by drugs and alcohol. According to the NSW Centre for Road Safety, cocaine was associated with 11 road fatalities between 2012 and 2016, compared with almost 300 associated with cannabis, ecstasy and ice.

    There were 393 deaths on NSW roads in 2017, the worst result in seven years. The December period saw a number of crashes involving multiple fatalities, including 22 deaths across the country in the fortnight leading up to Christmas.

    Annabelle Falkholt, 21, died in a crash on the NSW south coast that also killed her parents and another driver on Boxing Day. Her sister, the actor Jessica Falkholt, remains in a critical condition after having her life support switched off last week.

    The high December death toll has focused attention on road safety laws, despite coming at the end of a year in which the road toll across the country reached near-record lows.

    The number of deaths per 100,000 people fell to 4.92 in the 12 months to the end of November, which is close to the all time low of 4.9 set in 2014.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australi...olice-pressure
    SINNERS MCC AUSTRALIA
    If we believe in “freedom”, we don’t get to choose whose freedom is most worth defending.
    Out of 5 million sperm... your the retard that got through? and I thought I was having a bad day!

  • #2
    An "association" is not a cause. Actually, it could be successfully argued that cocaine might actually improve driver/rider performance. The success of any drug in achieving efficacy is highly dose level dependent. Hey repeat for elevated levels of insulin, blood pressure medication, steroid based anti-inflammatories and NASIDS. Caffeine. Test for them, you will see. I think you could safely bet that there would be an even higher "association" with road trauma. Meanwhile the root cause goes unnoticed.

    The article presents a very hamfisted view, something akin to racism. I don't think it does the case of the image of efforts to improve road safety any good at all actually.

    Cops enforce. They want more things to enforce, including things which might be unconnected with the issue (road safety) in order to muster more resources. This more enforcement is then touted as a success for road safety by the political types. Nice try, but fairly pathetic on the scale of things.

    It annoys me to see such logic, to read of such unthinking, contradictory BS as this latest round of road safety mantra It's witch hunt stuff, and is comparable to any racist, religious extremism you can point out.

    In this, you see the "tip of the iceberg" insofar as building a belief system by people with some power and influence. The "wall" that is being fortified is that of the prohibition of recreational drugs, and the protection of existing regulatory functions with regards to same, regulation and enforcement as the answer BS...

    So far as the Guardians way of putting this, well just look at end of the article - yeah just throw in a human interest emotive slant for good measure oh, with some numbers. That's bound to be a winner, despite statistics which, taken as an average tend to suggest that measures already in place are being perfectly successful.
    The trick is to grow old. "Growing up" is less important than surviving.

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