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  • Leather Care

    Well if you are like me, you've got some favourite old gear which you've put away somewhere and look at it, or use it now and again when the occasion arises.

    In my case it is a WW2 vintage leather Surcoat, which is a favourite when it is REALLY cold. It sort of wraps one up completely and leaves nothing exposed except from the knees down. It's a wonderful bit of old gear. I haven't been using it much as My lifestyle (work away) keeps me from riding at all in the Winter. Take it from me, this was just the thing for long rides at sub-zero temperatures.

    I had a shock the other day. It's been hanging (on a hanger) on the hallway unused for more years than is good for a thing. It's become a little bit stiff, and it's time to give it some TLC, along with some other gear, noticeably my nice Mars leather pants, which no longer fit! HMM! I've actually lost weight since I last wore them - THEY've changed. I'll have to see what can be done.

    Open to all and sundry in relation to your favourite leather treatment or solutions to my problem(s) Yeah, I know everyone has gone textile, but I like my genuine leather stuff, and would rather wear it on any but a hot day with the sun beating down. There would surely be a wealth of experience and advice available here.

    So what do YOU do, or have you done, to soften and restore, or even stretch leather back to its original. this will be genuine advice which I might or might not take. I've already discounted a lot of the BS on the 'net. With the pants, while it might seem attractive to soak them in water, just get them on and ride until they are totally dry - yeah, it works, I've done it. In this case, I've got to get them on first. Therein might be the problem.

    Over to you.
    The trick is to grow old. "Growing up" is less important than surviving.

  • #2
    Renapur Leather Balsam for gloves, Aussie made Leather Seal for pants, boots and jackets.
    Rossi chuck in a wee tub when you buy their boots and it's not too bad either
    When the gear is copping a workout in the past, duds get done monthly & jackets about 2 monthly.
    All very weather dependent of course. If the shit gets wet & grubby, dry and start again
    I don't believe an all weather 100% dry cow, has ever been invented

    The textile stuff ??? Do nufin whatsoever
    I just called, to say........go get pharked

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm a big fan of leather. over my life I've managed to ride through 2 swarms of bees. Once in leather, once in textile.

      With Leather it's easy. Squirt with the hose, scrub go for a good ride, done. Hey if you want to get fussy, sponge with a wet sponge, finish with saddle soap and your favourite dressing, done.

      With textiles, the sponge does nothing, the ants will never leave your clothing alone and if you put the thing in the wash, your membrane is a memory, if it worked at all. At least with the washing machine treatment, you no longer gain the attention of the ants every time you take your jacket off.
      The trick is to grow old. "Growing up" is less important than surviving.

      Comment


      • #4
        Snow seal
        Water beads on this stuff
        No more heavy leathers in the rain
        Great stuff

        I also tried dubbin and RM Williams leather conditioner

        It all works
        Rub on
        Put in sun
        It sweats into the leather in the sun
        Massage excess in

        Easy peasy

        But IIWII
        Silence is Golden, Duct Tape is Silver

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jstava View Post
          I'm a big fan of leather. over my life I've managed to ride through 2 swarms of bees. Once in leather, once in textile.

          With Leather it's easy. Squirt with the hose, scrub go for a good ride, done. Hey if you want to get fussy, sponge with a wet sponge, finish with saddle soap and your favourite dressing, done.

          With textiles, the sponge does nothing, the ants will never leave your clothing alone and if you put the thing in the wash, your membrane is a memory, if it worked at all. At least with the washing machine treatment, you no longer gain the attention of the ants every time you take your jacket off.
          Yep .
          Earth Child - In harmony with the planet

          Comment


          • #6
            I still remember the stuff I used, a lot of it, of JS's. It was good shit.

            Simone got into it too. I don't think there was much left.

            I still seem to fall back on Dubbin though, and sweat it in the sun. Give it a week or two and then give it a good coat of pure beeswax - you won't need to retouch it for 12 months. And, it is good waterproofer.

            Education is what you get from reading the small print.
            Experience is what you get from not reading it.

            Comment


            • #7
              I am big Dubbin fan....Every winter / expected downtime I trowel it on my jacket, vest and boots and let Itsoak in for as long as possible (week or more)
              I don't like being outdoors Smithers, for one thing, there's too many fat children. - C. Montgomery Burns
              DBB Post Veteran
              1740 DBB Post Veteran - Second Tour (Completed 23/06/11)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Roo View Post
                I still remember the stuff I used, a lot of it, of JS's. It was good shit.

                Simone got into it too. I don't think there was much left.

                I still seem to fall back on Dubbin though, and sweat it in the sun. Give it a week or two and then give it a good coat of pure beeswax - you won't need to retouch it for 12 months. And, it is good waterproofer.
                That was SnoSeal. I use a lot of it in the Winter. More economical than some of the other things. It's pretty good stuff.

                I used a product called Nikwax last Winter - it was the cream, supplied with a pair of mittens which I bought to be my bottom line in horrid conditions. It worked a treat, but the mittens had a finish on them which might have contributed to the effectiveness of the cream. I must try it on my work gloves this coming winter. It is dearer. There is a range of products from Nikwax. I suspect they have some silicon in them which would provide a superior level of water repellency. It will be an interesting test. By the way, my mittens did leak a little at the seams, but I retained a pretty good level of comfort.

                My normal work gloves are uncoated fleece lined riggers gloves. They absorb SnoSeal admirably if one provides a liberal coating with the gloves on, then rub them together close to the radiant heat of a fire. It melts in. It does forestall wet hands. Eventually, they will get wet right through from handling wet tools and things. If you wring the water out - pretty normal, you also wring out the snow seal. Needs reapplication. How wet does it get? try clenching your fists, if you can wring a quarter of a cup of liquid out of your gloves just by clenching your fists, that's wet. If you have to take off the gloves and wring them out in the conventional way, it's not THAT wet. Wring the water out and they always feel a little warmer, for a little while anyway.

                I have never found a satisfactorily dry pair of motorcycle gloves, except for when I used a pair of industrial strength milk vat cleaning gloves which I wore over my regular gauntlets. THEY kept my hands completely dry. Usually, I just wear a pair of plain leather gloves accept wet hands and turn up the heated grips.
                The trick is to grow old. "Growing up" is less important than surviving.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Who remembers the one we used way back when - oh shit, 50 years ago I think it was mainly animal fats. It came in a half gallon gold tin with blue writing on it.

                  It was cruel and stank to high heaven - a bone colour with brown veins through it. Used to see a lot of it around railway stations. They'd use it on their canvass mail bags and station to station mail staffs - the ones that station masters would swap with engineers on through steam engines at all sorts of speeds.

                  As painters, we'd buy it in 15 gallon drums - we boiled it in a big bathroom copper (remember them?) and ran our scaffold sheets through it. Gawd it was putrid. We'd hang the sheets on the outside of high scaffolds so we could work in rain, snow and sub zero temps. It was that good and rank the first few days after the 'dunking' that we had to hunt magpies from pecking holes in the sheets - eating them!

                  As budding young kick arse bikies it was good on anything leather and the aroma just added to the aura. Terrific on riding boots with the wrap over tongues. They were lace-ups, but we rarely got wet feet.

                  It would probably be on a 'hazard materials' list today. But, it was good shit - literally

                  Education is what you get from reading the small print.
                  Experience is what you get from not reading it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Leather waterproofing and conditioner mix for any interested:
                    I just finished cooking up a new batch of my leather waterproofing and conditioner mix for my bike gear.
                    400grams beeswax
                    200ml Olive Oil
                    1000 ml (1 Ltr) Neatsfoot Oil
                    Heat the beeswax, (while gently stirring), until it fully melts and then stir in the Neatsfoot Oil and the olive oil and keep on the heat until it all comes back to uncloudy liquid again.
                    Pour into a suitable container that you can get your hand and a rag into - I use one of the square biscuit tins.
                    When set (cools down) it is the consistency of Vaseline petroleum jelly.
                    Wipes onto leather gear easily. I often leave it on overnight and then gently buff off the next day. Works a treat
                    SINNERS MCC AUSTRALIA
                    If we believe in “freedom”, we don’t get to choose whose freedom is most worth defending.
                    Out of 5 million sperm... your the retard that got through? and I thought I was having a bad day!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Prickle View Post
                      Leather waterproofing and conditioner mix for any interested:
                      I just finished cooking up a new batch of my leather waterproofing and conditioner mix for my bike gear.
                      400grams beeswax
                      200ml Olive Oil
                      1000 ml (1 Ltr) Neatsfoot Oil
                      Heat the beeswax, (while gently stirring), until it fully melts and then stir in the Neatsfoot Oil and the olive oil and keep on the heat until it all comes back to uncloudy liquid again.
                      Pour into a suitable container that you can get your hand and a rag into - I use one of the square biscuit tins.
                      When set (cools down) it is the consistency of Vaseline petroleum jelly.
                      Wipes onto leather gear easily. I often leave it on overnight and then gently buff off the next day. Works a treat
                      I'll give it a go Prickle
                      Thanks
                      Silence is Golden, Duct Tape is Silver

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Roo View Post
                        Who remembers the one we used way back when - oh shit, 50 years ago I think it was mainly animal fats. It came in a half gallon gold tin with blue writing on it.

                        It was cruel and stank to high heaven - a bone colour with brown veins through it. Used to see a lot of it around railway stations. They'd use it on their canvass mail bags and station to station mail staffs - the ones that station masters would swap with engineers on through steam engines at all sorts of speeds.

                        As painters, we'd buy it in 15 gallon drums - we boiled it in a big bathroom copper (remember them?) and ran our scaffold sheets through it. Gawd it was putrid. We'd hang the sheets on the outside of high scaffolds so we could work in rain, snow and sub zero temps. It was that good and rank the first few days after the 'dunking' that we had to hunt magpies from pecking holes in the sheets - eating them!

                        As budding young kick arse bikies it was good on anything leather and the aroma just added to the aura. Terrific on riding boots with the wrap over tongues. They were lace-ups, but we rarely got wet feet.

                        It would probably be on a 'hazard materials' list today. But, it was good shit - literally
                        Lard?????
                        Dont get me confused with someone who gives a fuck

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "Who remembers the one we used way back when - oh shit, 50 years ago"

                          No one
                          My biggest concern back then was trying to work out what to do with this hard thing in my pants ???
                          Nowadays it's the same age old question, but change the word 'hard' to soft

                          That concoction sounds interesting Prickle
                          But Ghost can make a batch for all of us
                          I just called, to say........go get pharked

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            "But Ghost can make a batch for all of us."

                            Well just visit and use all of his, like we did with JS

                            Soft?? Dunno what yer talkin about??

                            Education is what you get from reading the small print.
                            Experience is what you get from not reading it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Soft?? Dunno what yer talkin about??


                              My leather.....after all it's great rubbin' with dubbin of course
                              I just called, to say........go get pharked

                              Comment

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